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12 Best Sites Like Etsy (Marketplaces Alternative to Etsy)

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12 Best Sites Like Etsy

1. Artfire

(Supporting local makers)


Artfire is similar to other selling sites like Etsy. It only offers craft supplies, vintage items and handmade goods. However, there is a difference in the selling plans:

  • Standard: Costs $4.95 per month, but you’ll still need to pay a listing fee. This is $0.23 per item. There is also a final value fee of 12.75%.
  • Popular: Costs $20 per month. There is no listing fee and the final value fee drops to 4.5%.
  • Featured: Costs $40 per month. No listing fees and a 4.5% final value fee. However, this plan allows you to list up to 2500 items and provides enhanced site exposure. 

Another feature that makes Artfire unique is that shoppers can post a “wanted” ad if they are looking for a specific item. 

2. Ruby Lane

(Specializes in vintage pieces)


Ruby Lane is the largest marketplace for vintage pieces including antiques, jewelry and art. However, this site provides you with access to data from Google Analytics and connect with Skype to chat with customers. You can even use third party marketing tools. 

While Ruby Lane is one of the sites like Etsy, it sets itself apart with its secret shopper program. Ruby Lane privately contacts sellers with recommendations and feedback if a purchase doesn’t meet the marketplace standards. 

Although there are no listing fees, you will need to pay a maintenance fee of up to $54 per month. This varies according to your listings. There is also a 6.7% service fee, but this is capped at $250. 

3. Amazon Handmade

(The world’s biggest online selling site)


Amazon is a massie ecommerce giant operating in over 80 countries. However, it is not just large retailers who can offer products. The Amazon Handmade branch is a great option for crafty people looking for sites like Etsy. 

A report found that 63% of people start researching their purchases on Amazon. So, this is a great marketplace for your crafty enterprise. 

To become a seller on Amazon Handmade, you need to submit an application. You will also need to register for a Pro selling plan. This costs $39.99 per month usually, but this is waived for Handmade sellers. However, Amazon does take a 15% commission on each sale to cover its costs. 

crafts to make and sell

4. Aftcra

(Supporting American artisans)


Aftcra is one of the sites like Etsy that is exclusively for American artisans and sellers of handcrafted items. There is a strict Aftcra definition of what constitutes handmade. This includes items being made by hand rather than machine made. 

There are no fees to set up your store and create your listings. However, you will need to pay a 7% transaction fee when you sell an item. 

5. Folksy

(The UK’s largest online craft fair)


Folksy is the UK’s version of Aftcra. It is specifically designed for artisans in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. 

There are no fees to sign up for a Folksy account. However, there are some fees you’ll need to consider:

  • Listing Fee: £0.15 + VAT per item
  • Commission: 6% +VAT on each item sold
  • PayPal or Stripe Fees: You need to accept payments through either of these platforms. So, you’ll also need to cover the associated fees. 

If you plan on listing a lot of items, you can opt for a Plus account. This costs £5 per month. But, you can have unlimited listings and free relistings. 

6. Storenvy

(Specializes in small, independent brands)


Storenvy is a marketplace for over 67,000 brands. It takes pride in showcasing high quality products. The platform has a higher average sales price compared to Etsy. The team also promotes sellers’ items on social media. This can give your listings far more mileage than paying for promotion on other platforms. 

A free Storenvy account allows you to sell up to 1,000 products. If you anticipate selling more items or want to access additional seller benefits, you can choose a premium account. These cost $14.99 and $29.00.

You can sell practically any item on Storenvy including:

  • Clothing
  • Accessories
  • Jewelry
  • Home goods
  • Art
  • Music
  • Merch
  • Toys and Games
  • Electronics
  • Specialty Items

The only fee you need to cover is a 15% commission on each item you sell. Otherwise there are no other fees. 

7. iCraftGifts

(No listing, commission or transaction fees)


Icraftgifts is a Canadian marketplace that is open to sellers around the world. Unlike Etsy and many sites like Etsy, it is restricted to crafts and original art only. You can’t sell craft supplies or vintage items. 

There is a one time registration fee of $25. This is non refundable. You can then choose a subscription package. These vary in cost from $10 to $15 per month. However, there are no listing, commission or transaction fees. 

8. Spoonflower

(Specializing in custom fabrics)


Spoonflower allows sellers to upload their designs for bedding, decor and other home furnishing items. Your design may be sold and printed on gift wrap, wallpaper or fabric. 

You’ll earn a base commission of 10% of the design retail price, regardless of promotions and discounts. 

9. Zibbet

(Sell on multiple channels in one place)


Zibbet is a great platform for your handcrafted items. It allows sellers to promote items on multiple channels in the one place. So, you may sell simultaneously on the Zibbet marketplace and Etsy directly through the platform. This is a valuable timesaver. You can also ensure your items are properly listed across the different platforms. 

You can sell a variety of items on Zibbet. This includes:

  • Fine art
  • Jewelry
  • Handmade crafts
  • Photography
  • Digital downloads
  • Wedding items

Zibbet also has a simple, all inclusive price structure. You’ll pay just $5 per month for each of your sales channels. 

10. Artful Home

(Jury approved applications)


Artful Home is a marketplace for artists selling products in a variety of categories including jewelry, home decor and art. However, what makes the platform interesting is that you need to submit an application to join. A “jury” of Artful Home members reviews each application. The jury will only approve applications that are consistent with the “artistic integrity” of the platform. 

Once Artful Home accepts your application, you’ll need to pay a one off membership fee. This is $300, but you can pay it in $25 per month installments over your first year. There are no other charges or fees. 

11. UncommonGoods

(Niche market for uniquely beautiful handmade items)


UncommonGoods is a planet friendly platform for creatives selling green items. To sell your items on the platform, you need to submit the products for review. You’ll need to provide product descriptions, pictures, website and other details about your handcrafted items. 

The items you can sell on UncommonGoods include:

  • Some clothing
  • Jewelry
  • Bags
  • Wallets
  • Accessories
  • Arts & crafts
  • Home Decor
  • Electronics 
  • Food & Drink

12. Luualla

(Open a free store with up to 100 listings)


Luulla is one of the sites like Etsy that offers a little more for creative entrepreneurs. You can open up a free store and sell up to 100 items for free. Luulla will provide you with a basic online storefront along with resources to help you reach your target audience. 

You can also opt for a subscription plan. These cost $5 to $20, but allow you to list more items. 

As a seller, you’ll need to pay a small transaction fee of 5% to 8%. You can sell practically any handmade item including:

  • Clothing
  • Accessories
  • Housewares
  • Jewelry
  • Candles & Soaps
  • Edibles
  • Pottery & ceramics

13. Zazzle

(Become a maker or designer)


Become a Maker or Designer

Zazzle offers the best of both worlds. You can sell products as a maker or sell art as a designer. It is also possible to upload your art, making it available for print on demand. 

You can set up a shop for free. It is even possible to set your own royalty rates to earn what you like. Zazzle will take care of all the other details. 

Zazzle Summary

  • Opportunity to make passive income
  • Zazzle takes care of production, fulfilment & customer service
  • You can choose your own royalty fee
  • Upload your designs on 1000+ products

Is it Worth Having an Etsy shop?


If you’re continually getting compliments on the homemade crafts you gift to others or the items you make to decorate your home, you could turn talent into an income stream. Your first thought may be to open an Etsy store, but this may not be the best idea.

There are 2.5 million sellers on Etsy, making it a highly competitive marketplace.

Etsy can be a good place to sell your items. There is lower risk and lower costs when compared to selling at craft shows. 

The fees for the platform include:

  • $0.20 listing fee per item
  • 5% transaction fee on the total cost including shipping
  • 3% + $0.25 payment processing fee if you use Etsy Payments

While these fees are very reasonable, there are some reasons why you may want to consider other sites like Etsy. 

Etsy Summary

  • Easy to set up & maintain your store
  • Market to a large audience – 45+ million active Etsy buyers
  • Built-in analytics to analyze your performance & make data-driven decisions
  • No shop fees

Reasons to Consider Sites Like Etsy


While Etsy is a solid platform, there are other ecommerce options. 

Here are just some of the common reasons to consider sites like Etsy.

Stand Out From Your Competition:

It can be a challenge for an Etsy seller to stand apart from the crowd. Even if a potential customer is on your product page, the platform recommends similar products. So, even if you shell out for a paid promotion, you’ll still be pitted against other sellers. 

You Need Additional Marketing Options:

The Etsy platform doesn’t allow for many ecommerce marketing approaches. There is an option for paid promotions, but you can’t harness Facebook remarketing or collect your buyer’s email addresses. In fact, you can’t even communicate with your customers after you complete a sale. 

You Want to Expand Your Product Line:

Etsy only allows handmade items, vintage products or craft supplies on the platform. So, if you want to expand your product line, or can no longer hand make each item to meet demand, you won’t be able to use Etsy. 

Is There a Better Site Than Etsy?


If you’re making handcrafted items, there are lots of sites like Etsy. These offer different benefits and advantages depending on the type of product you make. While Etsy is a reputable platform, the high competition can make it difficult to find buyers.

If you want to stand apart from the crowd, platforms like UncommonGoods review applications to eliminate low quality goods.

So, before you set up an Etsy store, it may be well worth checking out the sites like Etsy, as you may find one that is better suited to your business needs. 


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